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…strategizing > reacting

March 31, 2014

Because spontaneity and effective discipline rarely go hand in hand. There are rare exceptions, but unless you have a particular genius for thinking quickly in high stress situations all the time you, like me, will not do your best creative thinking while in the middle of those didn’t want a nap today melt-down, fist pounding tantrum, sibling biting, screeching in the middle of Target, interrupting your phone call to the principal to tattle about sister hitting him with her baseball bat, 10th time today he’s taken her toy, kind of moments.

And the drama doesn’t even have to be as obvious to push our stress levels to the extreme. Just the constant repetition of authority challenges can wear on anyone’s nerves. Not the best time to be figuring out how to discipline your kid. When we don’t have a plan in place one of two things are likely to happen:

1. We use our frustration and/or anger as a punishment. Yep, we’ve all been here. We get louder and angrier and make sure everyone knows we are not happy at all – essentially, we throw tantrums. This not only damages our relationships with our children (and our self-respect), but for some kids gives them a point of manipulation they can use to wear us down. A button. A button that can be used again and again. Buttons don’t have a chance against a plan.
2. We give in. This is especially tempting in public. However, any progress made on previous attempts to change the child’s behavior in this area has just been compromised. But for a second we feel like we can breathe. Unfortunately, this feeling is deceptive because the onslaught has only intensified because the boundaries have been compromised. We’ve all been here. At this point denial often sets in, along with all kinds of excuses as to why we couldn’t handle it, or we tell ourselves that it’s just kids being kids and that they’ll grow out of it. Deep down we know neither are true. They may grow out of a specific way to avoid responsible choices, but they will find others; and you absolutely can handle this. You just need an effective plan.

These reactions compromise the overall goals of helping our children to have self-discipline and become responsible – to deny themselves and choose what’s right over what they want at that moment. But to accomplish this we must have a plan that we can immediately fall back onto before “Fine, whatever,” or Parent-Sized-Meltdowns start to sound like good ideas.

So, here’s how a plan looks:

Step 1: Once a week or so (more often when needed), sit down and really evaluate which areas you’re struggling to discipline each of your children in. If you’re married it is important that you do this together to have a united front. Come up with a consequence for each issue that you feel will not only be effective but, ideally, teach the moral of the story as well. For instance, if you’re kids are around 10 and 8 and your son has started making rude comments to his little sister to get under her skin (not naming names here… ;)), after evaluating the situation you might assign him the task of serving her for a day explaining that he has also had to try to think of things that could be helpful to her without being asked in order to prove to her that he cares about her. The method you use will vary by personality and developmental age of your kid. For instance, if your kids are younger, simpler forms of discipline can be more effective. If one strategy does not work, revamp it in your next session.

Step 2: For most offenses you’ll need to communicate to the child the agreed upon consequences as soon as they’ve been established. Explain to them that they have a choice: to follow your rule, or to accept the consequences. The key is that it is then their responsibility to choose. This step is critical. The child deserves to know what your boundaries are and what will happen if they cross them. Surprise consequences often leave them with a feeling of injustice instead of the knowledge of their personal responsibility. For very young ones the consistent repetition of the decided on discipline serves as the communication (for example: every time my baby son tried to screech his displeasure we’d interrupt the screech by blowing in his face until he gave it up – this was at 2 months old; for my daughter it required flicking her cheek along with a firm “no” each time because she started at about 7 months), but after about 18-24 months explaining in age appropriate terms becomes more and more important. Remember that little ones understand more than they are able to communicate, but action speaks louder than words.

Step 3: Follow through consistently. Consistency has been the mantra of every parenting book and guru for as long as I can remember, but practicing it still seems to be extremely difficult for most of us. Fortunately, the first two steps I just shared with you, once implemented, will staying consistent much, much easier. One thing to remember, especially when starting a new strategy or dealing with a new issue, is that it will take some time for your kids to adjust. They may not believe that you’ll follow through if you’ve given in in the past. Generally, you’ll start to feel the effects within a few weeks. Just remember to be more stubborn than your child.

Also, it’s generally a good idea to think of an escalation consequence in case the first level doesn’t work right away. In other words, if he does something once he might be given a warning (especially if he’s young or the consequence for this issue is a new one) and reminded of the consequences, but if he repeats it the first level of consequence is put into effect. If that fails to convince him, the next level is used.

To be clear, your child will never become perfect. They will go through changes and with each stage they’ll need new strategies for learning self-discipline and responsibility, but utilizing a plan will make your job easier and leave you with more time to really enjoy your kids – making for a more peaceful, relaxing home and more secure, happy kids.

Ok, now after you’ve started your plan let me know how it’s going. If you have any specific issue you’ve been unable to find the right consequence for, please feel free to explain your issue in a comment along with the options you’ve already tried. Full Disclosure: I do believe that spanking when limited and never done in anger, but with ample forewarning as outlined in the plan, can be effective for many types of offenses for most kids, particularly when they’re 2-5 . If you don’t believe in it, although I think you might be unnecessarily limiting your options, I respect your choice, so just let me know if you’ve taken that strategy off the table.

…you can’t discipline your kids…

May 29, 2013

…unless you commit to being a disciplined parent.  Teaching discipline to kids is more about being disciplined yourself than it is about disciplining them.

You can even be correcting them and/or praising them and not actually be disciplining them.  Read more…

…you don’t need to hide

May 17, 2013

Today, I felt impressed to share something very personal.  Being on the stage of our church frequently as a young adult I was given a lot of “advice” about how to dress appropriately.  Even when I followed the rules I was criticized because I still looked different than most other women.  So, because I didn’t want to offend anyone I found myself buying very unflattering clothing that wasn’t budgeted to appease well meaning onlookers.  I also found out that once I started down that road it led to feeling that I was a problem – as if God had created me inappropriately.

For the last 8 years or so I’ve been mostly out of the spotlight.  During that time I’ve gone through the figure ups and downs of my post pregnancy body and have replaced my entire wardrobe.  With the pressure off and only my husband to please my choices have been much, much more flattering to my figure.  I sometimes experience nasty looks from strangers, snubs from acquaintances, and distance between friends for it, but I think some of this is due to some misconceptions that I would like to attempt to right.  I hope this illustration I created will at least start the conversations and thought processes necessary to get there and, perhaps, help to heal others who have been unjustly labeled.

Figures

(If you’re having a hard time reading the text, try clicking on the photo to get a separate window you can adjust the size of)

…your destination does not travel to you

May 13, 2013

It’s my 34th birthday, and today I came across this TED Talk that is close to my heart.

http://www.ted.com/talks/meg_jay_why_30_is_not_the_new_20.html

This year, my husband and I will celebrate our 15th anniversary, so those of you quick with math have already figured out that I was just 19 when I married. I also have two children, ages 9 & 7. You could say my twenties were eventful. Having experienced working with teens most of those 15 years I do not recommend this exact timeline for most people, but despite some major challenges it has been an amazing and wonderful ride for us.

With as much as we’ve accomplished already, I also know that life has a lot of adventures left in store including travel and possible ministry and career paths. God’s not done writing our stories no matter how old we become.  So, as you watch the video, please keep in mind that it’s not important that you have all your big events and decisions checked off your list in your twenties. What is important is that you are taking the steps she recommends for moving toward your future. Life’s journey can not magically transport you to your future with all your hopes and dreams acquired if you treat now like one long, pointless pit stop.

…about real spiritual leadership

April 22, 2013

A friend recently asked me what I thought spiritual leadership looks like in a husband.  Her question isn’t rare, and it might seem like a difficult one, but I’ve learned that it’s really very simple.  Read more…

…to give is better than to receive

August 15, 2012

Ok, so maybe they did tell me this one – it’s just taken me this long notice that it applies to the marriage relationship, too.  I guess I had always thought about it in terms of Christmas presents and charitable efforts.  However, it’s gained new meaning to me as I’ve reflected on the last 14 years with my husband. Read more…

…the most challenging project you will ever manage is…

February 2, 2012

yourself.  Your time.  Your temper.  Your attitude…

Right now my project is time management.  I recently took my husband up on a request for a timeline of how much everything I needed to do each week actually took to complete.  I knew I wasn’t getting everything done and was often overwhelmed, but I assumed Read more…

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